The Collected Tales of Nikolai Gogol

Valutazione media 4,35
( su 10.057 valutazioni fornite da GoodReads )
 
9780375706158: The Collected Tales of Nikolai Gogol

When Pushkin first read some of the stories in this collection, he declared himself "amazed."  "Here is real gaiety," he wrote, "honest, unconstrained, without mincing, without primness. And in places what poetry! . . . I still haven't recovered."

More than a century and a half later, Nikolai Gogol's stories continue to delight readers the world over. Now a stunning new translation--from an award-winning team of translators--presents these stories in all their inventive, exuberant glory to English-speaking readers. For the first time, the best of Gogol's short fiction is brought together in a single volume: from the colorful Ukrainian tales that led some critics to call him "the Russian Dickens" to the Petersburg stories, with their black humor and wonderfully demented attitude toward the powers that be. All of Gogol's most memorable creations are here: the minor official who misplaces his nose, the downtrodden clerk whose life is changed by the acquisition of a splendid new overcoat, the wily madman who becomes convinced that a dog can tell him everything he needs to know.

These fantastic, comic, utterly Russian characters have dazzled generations of readers and had a profound influence on writers such as Dostoevsky and Nabokov. Now they are brilliantly rendered in the first new translation in twenty-five years--one that is destined to become the definitive edition of Gogol's most important stories.

Le informazioni nella sezione "Riassunto" possono far riferimento a edizioni diverse di questo titolo.

L'autore:

Nikolai Gogol was born in the Ukraine in 1809 and died in 1852. Originally trained as a painter, he became interested in the theater and was soon known for his plays and short stories, notably "The Diary of a Madman"  (1834), "The Nose"  (1836), and "The Overcoat"  (1842). Dead Souls, his novel, was published in 1842.

Richard Pevear, a native of Boston, and Larissa Volokhonsky, a native of Leningrad, are married and live in France. Their translation of Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov won the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize.

Also translated by Pevear and Volokhonsky, (and also available from Vintage Books) are Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol; and Crime and Punishment, Demons, and Notes from Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky.

Estratto. © Riproduzione autorizzata. Diritti riservati.:

Translated and Annotated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky

St. John's Eve
A True Story Told by the Beadle of the ------ Church

Foma Grigorievich was known to have this special sort of quirk: he mortally disliked telling the same thing over again. It sometimes happened, if you talked him into telling something a second time, that you'd look and he'd throw in some new thing or change it so it was unrecognizable. Once one of those gentlemen--it's hard for us simple folk to fit a name to them: writers, no, not writers, but the same as the dealers at our fairs: they snatch, they cajole, they steal all sorts of stuff, and then bring out booklets no thicker than a primer every month or week--one of those gentlemen coaxed this same story out of Foma Grigorievich, who then forgot all about it. Only there comes this same young sir from Poltava in a pea-green caftan, whom I've already mentioned and one of whose stories I think you've already read, toting a little book with him, and opening it in the middle, he shows it to us. Foma Grigorievich was just about to saddle his nose with his spectacles, but remembering that he'd forgotten to bind them with thread and stick it down with wax, he handed the book to me. Having a smattering of letters and not needing spectacles, I began to read. Before I had time to turn two pages, he suddenly grabbed my arm and stopped me.

        "Wait! first tell me, what's that you're reading?"

        I confess, I was a bit taken aback by such a question.

        "What's this I'm reading, Foma Grigorievich? Why, your true story, your very own words."

        "Who told you those are my words?"

        "What better proof, it's printed here: told by the beadle So-and-so."

        "Spit on the head of the one who printed it! He's lying, the dad-blasted Muscovite! Did I say that? The devil it's the same! He's got a screw loose! Listen, I'll tell it to you now."

        We moved closer to the table and he began.

My grandfather (God rest his soul! and may he eat nothing in that world but white rolls and poppyseed cakes with honey!) was a wonderful storyteller. Once he began to talk, you wouldn't budge from your place the whole day for listening. No comparison with some present-day babbler, who starts spouting off, and in such language as if he hadn't had anything to eat for three days--you just grab your hat and run. I remember like now--the old woman, my late mother, was still alive--how on a long winter's evening, when there was a biting frost outside that walled us up solidly behind the narrow window of our cottage, she used to sit by the comb, pulling the long thread out with her hand, rocking the cradle with her foot, and humming a song that I can hear as if it was now. An oil lamp, trembling and flickering as if frightened of something, lighted our cottage. The spindle whirred; and all of us children, clustered together, listened to our grandfather, who was so old he hadn't left the stove in five years. But his wondrous talk about olden times, about Cossack raids, about the Polacks, about the mighty deeds of Podkova, Poltora Kozhukha, and Sagaidachny, never interested us as much as his stories about some strange marvel of old, which sent shivers all through us and made our hair stand on end. Now and then fear would take such hold of you that everything in the evening appeared like God knows what monster. If you happened to step out of the cottage at night for something, you'd think a visitor from the other world had gone to lie down in your bed. And may I never tell this story another time if I didn't often mistake my own blouse, from a distance, for a curled-up devil at the head of the bed. But the main thing in my grandfather's stories was that he never in his life told a lie, and whatever he used to say, that was precisely what had happened. I'll tell one of his wonderful stories for you now. I know there are lots of those smart alecks who do some scribbling in the courts and even read civic writings, and who, if they were handed a simple prayer book, wouldn't be able to make out a jot of it--but display their teeth shamefully, that they can do. For them, whatever you say is funny. Such disbelief has spread through the world! What's more--may God and the most pure Virgin not love me!--maybe even you won't believe me: once I made mention of witches, and what do you think? some daredevil turned up who didn't believe in witches! Yes, thank God, I've lived so long in the world, I've seen such infidels as find giving a priest a ride in a sieve easier than taking snuff is for the likes of us; and they, too, go in fear of witches. But if they were to dream . . . only I don't want to say what, there's no point talking about them.

        Way, way back, more than a hundred years ago--my late grandfather used to say--no one would even have recognized our village: a farmstead, the poorest of farmsteads! Some dozen huts, cobless, roofless, stuck up here and there in the middle of a field. Not a fence, not a decent barn to put cattle or a cart in. It was the rich ones that lived like that; and if you looked at our sort, the poor ones--a hole in the ground, there's your house! Only by the smoke could you tell that a creature of God lived there. You may ask, why did they live like that? It wasn't really poverty, because almost everybody then went Cossacking and got no small amount of goods in other lands; but more because there was no need to have a decent cottage. What folk weren't hanging about then: Crimeans, Polacks, Litvaks! It also happened that bunches of our own would come and rob their own. Everything happened.

        In this farmstead a man often appeared, or, better, a devil in human form. Where he came from and why he came, nobody knew. He'd carouse, drink, then suddenly vanish into thin air, without a trace. Then, lo and behold, again he'd as if fall from the sky, prowl the streets of the hamlet, of which there's no trace left now and which was maybe no more than a hundred paces from Dikanka. He'd pick up passing Cossacks: laughter, songs, money flowed, vodka poured like water . . . He used to accost pretty girls: gave them ribbons, earrings, necklaces--more than they knew what to do with! True, the pretty girls would hesitate a bit as they took the presents: God knows, maybe they really had passed through unclean hands. My grandfather's own aunt, who kept a tavern at the time on what is now Oposhnyanskaya Road, where Basavriuk--so this demonic man was known--used to carouse, she it was who said she wouldn't agree to take presents from him, not for all the blessings in the world. But, again, how not take: anybody would have been filled with fear when he knitted his bristling eyebrows and sent such a scowling look at you that you'd gladly let your legs carry you God knows where; and once you did take it--the very next night some friendly visitor from the swamp, with horns on his head, drags himself to you and starts strangling you, if you've got a necklace on your neck, or biting your finger, if you're wearing a ring, or pulling your braid, if you've braided a ribbon into it. God be with them, these presents! But the trouble is that you can't get rid of them: throw the devilish ring or necklace into the water, and it comes floating right back to your hands.

There was a church in the hamlet, of St. Panteleimon if I remember rightly. A priest lived by it then, Father Afanasy, of blessed memory. Noticing that Basavriuk did not come to church even on Easter Sunday, he decided to reprimand him and put him under a church penance. Penance, hah! He barely escaped. "Listen, my good sir!" the man thundered in reply, "you'd better mind your own business and not go meddling in other people's, unless you'd like to have that goat's gullet of yours plugged with hot kutya!" What could be done with the cursed fellow? Father Afanasy merely announced that anyone who kept company with Basavriuk would be regarded as a Catholic, an enemy of Christ's Church and of the whole human race.

        In that hamlet one Cossack called Korzh had a man working for him who was known as Pyotr Kinless--maybe because nobody remembered either his father or his mother. The church warden, it's true, said they'd died of the plague the next year; but my grandfather's aunt wouldn't hear of it and tried the best she could to endow him with kin, though poor Pyotr needed that as much as we need last year's snow. She said his father was still in the Zaporozhye, had been in captivity to the Turks, had suffered God knows what tortures, and by some miracle, after disguising himself as a eunuch, had given them the slip. The dark-browed girls and young women cared little about his kin. They merely said that if he was dressed in a new coat tied with a red belt, had a black astrakhan hat with a smart blue top put on his head, had a Turkish saber hung at his side, was given a horsewhip for one hand and a finely chased pipe for the other, not a lad in the world could hold a candle to him. But the trouble was that poor Petrus had only one gray blouse, with more holes in it than there are gold coins in a Jew's pocket. And that still wasn't so great a trouble, the real trouble was that old Korzh had a daughter, a beauty such as I think you've hardly chanced to see. My late grandfather's aunt used to say--and you know it's easier for a woman to kiss the devil, meaning no offense, than to call another woman a beauty--that the Cossack girl's plump cheeks were as fresh and bright as the first pink poppy when, having washed itself in God's dew, it glows, spreads its petals, and preens itself before the just-risen sun; that her eyebrows were like the black cords our girls now buy to hang crosses and ducats on from the Muscovites who go peddling with their boxes in our villages, arched evenly as if looking into her bright eyes; that her little mouth, at the sight of which the young men back then licked their lips, seemed to have been created for chanting nightingale songs; that her hair, black as the raven's wing and soft as young flax (at that time our girls did not yet wear braids with bright-colored ribbons twined in them), fell in curly locks on her gold-embroidered jacket. Ah, may God never grant me to sing "Alleluia" in the choir again if I wouldn't be kissing her here and now, even though the gray is creeping into the old forest that covers my head, and my old woman's by my side like a wart on a nose. Well, if a lad and a girl live near each other . . . you know yourself what comes of it. It used to be that at the break of dawn, the traces of iron-shod red boots could be seen at the spot where Pidorka had stood gabbling with her Petrus. But even so, nothing bad would ever have entered Korzh's mind, if Petrus hadn't decided one time--well, it's obvious none but the evil one prompted him--without taking a good look around the front hall, to plant a hearty kiss, as they say, on the Cossack girl's rosy lips, and the same evil one--may the son-of-a-bitch dream of the Holy Cross!--foolishly put the old coot up to opening the door. Korzh turned to wood, gaping and clinging to the doorpost. The cursed kiss seemed to stun him completely. It sounded louder to him than the blow of a pestle against the wall, something our peasants usually do to drive the clootie away, for lack of a gun and powder.

        Having recovered, he took his grandfather's horsewhip from the wall and was about to sprinkle poor Pyotr's back with it, when Pidorka's brother, the six-year-old Ivas, came running from nowhere, grabbed his legs with his little arms in fear, and shouted, "Daddy, daddy! don't beat Petrus!" What could he do? A father's heart isn't made of stone: he put the horsewhip back on the wall and led him quietly out of the cottage: "If you ever show up in my cottage again, or even just under the windows, then listen, Pyotr: by God, that'll be the end of your black moustache, and your topknot as well; here it is going twice around your ear, but it'll bid farewell to your head or I'm not Terenty Korzh!" Having said that, he gave him a slight cuff, so that Petrus, not seeing the ground under him, went flying headlong. There's kisses for you! Our two doves were grief-stricken; and then a rumor spread through the village that some Polack had taken to calling on Korzh, all trimmed in gold, with a moustache, with a saber, with spurs, with pockets that jingled like the little bell on the bag our sacristan Taras goes around the church with every day. Well, we know why someone comes calling on a father who has a dark-browed daughter. So one day Pidorka, streaming with tears, picked up her Ivas in her arms: "Ivas my dear, Ivas my love! run to Petrus, my golden child, quick as an arrow shot from a bow; tell him everything: I would love his brown eyes, I would kiss his white face, but my lot forbids me. More than one napkin is wet with my bitter tears. It's hard on me. I'm sick at heart. And my own father is my enemy: he's forcing me to marry the unloved Polack. Tell him the wedding is being prepared, only there won't be any music at our wedding: deacons will sing instead of pipes and mandolins. I won't step out to dance with my bridegroom: they will bear me away. Dark, dark will be my house: of maple wood it will be, and instead of a chimney there will be a cross on its roof!"

        As if turned to stone, not moving from the spot, Petro listened while the innocent child babbled Pidorka's words to him. "And I thought, luckless me, that I'd go to the Crimea and Turkey to war myself up some gold, and then come to you with wealth, my beauty. That's not to be. An evil eye has looked on us. There'll be a wedding for me, too, my dear little fish: only there won't be any deacons at that wedding; a black raven will crow over me instead of a priest; a smooth field will be my home and a gray cloud my roof; an eagle will peck my brown eyes out; the rains will wash the Cossack's bones, and the wind will dry them. But what am I doing? of whom, to whom shall I complain? God must will it so--if I perish, I perish!" and he plodded straight to the tavern.

        My late grandfather's aunt was slightly surprised to see Petrus in the tavern, and that at an hour when good people go to church, and she goggled her eyes at him, as if just waking up, when he ordered a jug of vodka as big as half a bucket. Only it was in vain that the poor fellow thought to drown his grief. The vodka pricked his tongue like nettles and tasted bitterer to him than wormwood. He pushed the jug off onto the ground. "Enough of this grieving, Cos...

Le informazioni nella sezione "Su questo libro" possono far riferimento a edizioni diverse di questo titolo.

I migliori risultati di ricerca su AbeBooks

1.

Nikolai Vasilevich Gogol
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi Quantità: > 20
Da
BWB
(Valley Stream, NY, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Condizione libro: New. Depending on your location, this item may ship from the US or UK. Codice libro della libreria 97803757061580000000

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 10,75
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: GRATIS
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

2.

Gogol, Nikolai
Editore: Vintage
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi PAPERBACK Quantità: > 20
Da
Mediaoutlet12345
(Springfield, VA, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Vintage. PAPERBACK. Condizione libro: New. 0375706151 *BRAND NEW* Ships Same Day or Next!. Codice libro della libreria SWATI2122088605

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 8,68
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,70
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

3.

GOGOL, NIKOLAI
Editore: Penguin Random House
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi Quantità: > 20
Da
INDOO
(Avenel, NJ, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Penguin Random House. Condizione libro: New. Brand New. Codice libro della libreria 0375706151

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 9,97
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,25
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

4.

Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
Editore: Random House USA Inc (1999)
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi Quantità: 3
Da
PBShop
(Wood Dale, IL, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Random House USA Inc, 1999. PAP. Condizione libro: New. New Book.Shipped from US within 10 to 14 business days. Established seller since 2000. Codice libro della libreria IB-9780375706158

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 9,89
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,70
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

5.

Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
Editore: Random House USA Inc, United States (1999)
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 1
Da
The Book Depository US
(London, Regno Unito)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Random House USA Inc, United States, 1999. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Vintage Classics ed. 203 x 132 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. When Pushkin first read some of the stories in this collection, he declared himself amazed. Here is real gaiety, he wrote, honest, unconstrained, without mincing, without primness. And in places what poetry! . . . I still haven t recovered. More than a century and a half later, Nikolai Gogol s stories continue to delight readers the world over. Now a stunning new translation--from an award-winning team of translators--presents these stories in all their inventive, exuberant glory to English-speaking readers. For the first time, the best of Gogol s short fiction is brought together in a single volume: from the colorful Ukrainian tales that led some critics to call him the Russian Dickens to the Petersburg stories, with their black humor and wonderfully demented attitude toward the powers that be. All of Gogol s most memorable creations are here: the minor official who misplaces his nose, the downtrodden clerk whose life is changed by the acquisition of a splendid new overcoat, the wily madman who becomes convinced that a dog can tell him everything he needs to know. These fantastic, comic, utterly Russian characters have dazzled generations of readers and had a profound influence on writers such as Dostoevsky and Nabokov. Now they are brilliantly rendered in the first new translation in twenty-five years--one that is destined to become the definitive edition of Gogol s most important stories. Codice libro della libreria AAS9780375706158

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 13,77
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: GRATIS
Da: Regno Unito a: U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

6.

Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol
Editore: Random House USA Inc, United States (1999)
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 1
Da
The Book Depository
(London, Regno Unito)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Random House USA Inc, United States, 1999. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Vintage Classics ed. 203 x 132 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. When Pushkin first read some of the stories in this collection, he declared himself amazed. Here is real gaiety, he wrote, honest, unconstrained, without mincing, without primness. And in places what poetry! . . . I still haven t recovered. More than a century and a half later, Nikolai Gogol s stories continue to delight readers the world over. Now a stunning new translation--from an award-winning team of translators--presents these stories in all their inventive, exuberant glory to English-speaking readers. For the first time, the best of Gogol s short fiction is brought together in a single volume: from the colorful Ukrainian tales that led some critics to call him the Russian Dickens to the Petersburg stories, with their black humor and wonderfully demented attitude toward the powers that be. All of Gogol s most memorable creations are here: the minor official who misplaces his nose, the downtrodden clerk whose life is changed by the acquisition of a splendid new overcoat, the wily madman who becomes convinced that a dog can tell him everything he needs to know. These fantastic, comic, utterly Russian characters have dazzled generations of readers and had a profound influence on writers such as Dostoevsky and Nabokov. Now they are brilliantly rendered in the first new translation in twenty-five years--one that is destined to become the definitive edition of Gogol s most important stories. Codice libro della libreria AAS9780375706158

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 13,79
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: GRATIS
Da: Regno Unito a: U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

7.

Gogol, Nikolai
Editore: Vintage
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi PAPERBACK Quantità: 3
Da
Movie Mars
(Indian Trail, NC, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Vintage. PAPERBACK. Condizione libro: New. 0375706151 Brand New Book. Ships from the United States. 30 Day Satisfaction Guarantee!. Codice libro della libreria 4303122

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 10,74
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,70
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

8.

Gogol, Nikolai
Editore: Vintage (1999)
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 3
Da
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Vintage, 1999. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Codice libro della libreria 0375706151

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 12,35
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 2,77
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

9.

Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol, Richard Pevear, Larissa Volokhonsky
Editore: Random House USA Inc
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 3
Da
THE SAINT BOOKSTORE
(Southport, Regno Unito)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Random House USA Inc. Paperback. Condizione libro: new. BRAND NEW, The Collected Tales of Nikolai Gogol (Vintage Classics ed), Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol, Richard Pevear, Larissa Volokhonsky. Codice libro della libreria B9780375706158

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 10,72
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 6,89
Da: Regno Unito a: U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

10.

Gogol, Nikolai
Editore: Vintage
ISBN 10: 0375706151 ISBN 13: 9780375706158
Nuovi PAPERBACK Quantità: 1
Da
Booklot COM LLC
(Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro Vintage. PAPERBACK. Condizione libro: New. 0375706151. Codice libro della libreria Z0375706151ZN

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 17,65
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: GRATIS
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

Vedi altre copie di questo libro

Vedi tutti i risultati per questo libro