Unix Power Tools

Valutazione media 4,13
( su 528 valutazioni fornite da GoodReads )
 
9780596003302: Unix Power Tools

With the growing popularity of Linux and the advent of Darwin, Unix has metamorphosed into something new and exciting. No longer perceived as a difficult operating system, more and more users are discovering the advantages of Unix for the first time. But whether you are a newcomer or a Unix power user, you'll find yourself thumbing through the goldmine of information in the new edition of Unix Power Tools to add to your store of knowledge. Want to try something new? Check this book first, and you're sure to find a tip or trick that will prevent you from learning things the hard way.The latest edition of this best-selling favorite is loaded with advice about almost every aspect of Unix, covering all the new technologies that users need to know. In addition to vital information on Linux, Darwin, and BSD, Unix Power Tools 3rd Edition now offers more coverage of bash, zsh, and other new shells, along with discussions about modern utilities and applications. Several sections focus on security and Internet access. And there is a new chapter on access to Unix from Windows, addressing the heterogeneous nature of systems today. You'll also find expanded coverage of software installation and packaging, as well as basic information on Perl and Python.Unix Power Tools 3rd Edition is a browser's book...like a magazine that you don't read from start to finish, but leaf through repeatedly until you realize that you've read it all. Bursting with cross-references, interesting sidebars explore syntax or point out other directions for exploration, including relevant technical details that might not be immediately apparent. The book includes articles abstracted from other O'Reilly books, new information that highlights program tricks and gotchas, tips posted to the Net over the years, and other accumulated wisdom.Affectionately referred to by readers as "the" Unix book, UNIX Power Tools provides access to information every Unix user is going to need to know. It will help you think creatively about UNIX, and will help you get to the point where you can analyze your own problems. Your own solutions won't be far behind.

Le informazioni nella sezione "Riassunto" possono far riferimento a edizioni diverse di questo titolo.

L'autore:

is a long time user of the Unix operating system. He has acted as a Unix consultant, courseware developer, and instructor. He is one of the originating authors of Unix Power Tools and the author of Learning the Unix Operating System by O'Reilly.

Shelley Powers is an independent contractor, currently living in St. Louis, who specializes in technology architecture and software development. She's authored several computer books, including Developing ASP Components, Unix Power Tools 3rd edition, Essential Blogging, and Practical RDF. In addition, Shelley has also written several articles related primarily to web technology, many for O'Reilly. Shelley's web site network is at http://burningbird.net, and her weblog is Burningbird, at http://weblog.burningbird.net.

Contenuti:

How to Use This Book; Preface; A Book for Browsing; Like an Almanac; Like a News Magazine; Like a Hypertext Database; Programs on the Web; About Unix Versions; Cross-References; What's New in the Third Edition; Typefaces and Other Conventions; The Authors; The Fine Print; Request for Comments; Acknowledgments for the First Edition; Acknowledgments for the Second Edition; Acknowledgments for the Third Edition; Part I: Basic Unix Environment; Chapter 1: Introduction; 1.1 What's Special About Unix?; 1.2 Power Grows on You; 1.3 The Core of Unix; 1.4 Communication with Unix; 1.5 Programs Are Designed to Work Together; 1.6 There Are Many Shells; 1.7 Which Shell Am I Running?; 1.8 Anyone Can Program the Shell; 1.9 Internal and External Commands; 1.10 The Kernel and Daemons; 1.11 Filenames; 1.12 Filename Extensions; 1.13 Wildcards; 1.14 The Tree Structure of the Filesystem; 1.15 Your Home Directory; 1.16 Making Pathnames; 1.17 File Access Permissions; 1.18 The Superuser (Root); 1.19 When Is a File Not a File?; 1.20 Scripting; 1.21 Unix Networking and Communications; 1.22 The X Window System; Chapter 2: Getting Help; 2.1 The man Command; 2.2 whatis: One-Line Command Summaries; 2.3 whereis: Finding Where a Command Is Located; 2.4 Searching Online Manual Pages; 2.5 How Unix Systems Remember Their Names; 2.6 Which Version Am I Using?; 2.7 What tty Am I On?; 2.8 Who's On?; 2.9 The info Command; Part II: Customizing Your Environment; Chapter 3: Setting Up Your Unix Shell; 3.1 What Happens When You Log In; 3.2 The Mac OS X Terminal Application; 3.3 Shell Setup Files ? Which, Where, and Why; 3.4 Login Shells, Interactive Shells; 3.5 What Goes in Shell Setup Files?; 3.6 Tip for Changing Account Setup: Keep a Shell Ready; 3.7 Use Absolute Pathnames in Shell Setup Files; 3.8 Setup Files Aren't Read When You Want?; 3.9 Gotchas in set prompt Test; 3.10 Automatic Setups for Different Terminals; 3.11 Terminal Setup: Testing TERM; 3.12 Terminal Setup: Testing Remote Hostname and X Display; 3.13 Terminal Setup: Testing Port; 3.14 Terminal Setup: Testing Environment Variables; 3.15 Terminal Setup: Searching Terminal Table; 3.16 Terminal Setup: Testing Window Size; 3.17 Terminal Setup: Setting and Testing Window Name; 3.18 A .cshrc.$HOST File for Per Host Setup; 3.19 Making a "Login" Shell; 3.20 RC Files; 3.21 Make Your Own Manpages Without Learning troff; 3.22 Writing a Simple Manpage with the -man Macros; Chapter 4: Interacting with Your Environment; 4.1 Basics of Setting the Prompt; 4.2 Static Prompts; 4.3 Dynamic Prompts; 4.4 Simulating Dynamic Prompts; 4.5 C-Shell Prompt Causes Problems in vi, rsh, etc.; 4.6 Faster Prompt Setting with Built-ins; 4.7 Multiline Shell Prompts; 4.8 Session Info in Window Title or Status Line; 4.9 A "Menu Prompt" for Naive Users; 4.10 Highlighting and Color in Shell Prompts; 4.11 Right-Side Prompts; 4.12 Show Subshell Level with $SHLVL; 4.13 What Good Is a Blank Shell Prompt?; 4.14 dirs in Your Prompt: Better Than $cwd; 4.15 External Commands Send Signals to Set Variables; 4.16 Preprompt, Pre-execution, and Periodic Commands; 4.17 Running Commands When You Log Out; 4.18 Running Commands at Bourne/Korn Shell Logout; 4.19 Stop Accidental Bourne-Shell Logouts; Chapter 5: Getting the Most out of Terminals, xterm, and X Windows; 5.1 There's a Lot to Know About Terminals; 5.2 The Idea of a Terminal Database; 5.3 Setting the Terminal Type When You Log In; 5.4 Querying Your Terminal Type: qterm; 5.5 Querying Your xterm Size: resize; 5.6 Checklist: Terminal Hangs When I Log In; 5.7 Find Out Terminal Settings with stty; 5.8 Setting Your Erase, Kill, and Interrupt Characters; 5.9 Working with xterm and Friends; 5.10 Login xterms and rxvts; 5.11 Working with Scrollbars; 5.12 How Many Lines to Save?; 5.13 Simple Copy and Paste in xterm; 5.14 Defining What Makes Up a Word for Selection Purposes; 5.15 Setting the Titlebar and Icon Text; 5.16 The Simple Way to Pick a Font; 5.17 The xterm Menus; 5.18 Changing Fonts Dynamically; 5.19 Working with xclipboard; 5.20 Problems with Large Selections; 5.21 Tips for Copy and Paste Between Windows; 5.22 Running a Single Command with xterm -e; 5.23 Don't Quote Arguments to xterm -e; Chapter 6: Your X Environment; 6.1 Defining Keys and Button Presses with xmodmap; 6.2 Using xev to Learn Keysym Mappings; 6.3 X Resource Syntax; 6.4 X Event Translations; 6.5 Setting X Resources: Overview; 6.6 Setting Resources with the -xrm Option; 6.7 How -name Affects Resources; 6.8 Setting Resources with xrdb; 6.9 Listing the Current Resources for a Client: appres; 6.10 Starting Remote X Clients; Part III: Working with Files and Directories; Chapter 7: Directory Organization; 7.1 What? Me, Organized?; 7.2 Many Homes; 7.3 Access to Directories; 7.4 A bin Directory for Your Programs and Scripts; 7.5 Private (Personal) Directories; 7.6 Naming Files; 7.7 Make More Directories!; 7.8 Making Directories Made Easier; Chapter 8: Directories and Files; 8.1 Everything but the find Command; 8.2 The Three Unix File Times; 8.3 Finding Oldest or Newest Files with ls -t and ls -u; 8.4 List All Subdirectories with ls -R; 8.5 The ls -d Option; 8.6 Color ls; 8.7 Some GNU ls Features; 8.8 A csh Alias to List Recently Changed Files; 8.9 Showing Hidden Files with ls -A and -a; 8.10 Useful ls Aliases; 8.11 Can't Access a File? Look for Spaces in the Name; 8.12 Showing Nonprintable Characters in Filenames; 8.13 Counting Files by Types; 8.14 Listing Files by Age and Size; 8.15 newer: Print the Name of the Newest File; 8.16 oldlinks: Find Unconnected Symbolic Links; 8.17 Picking a Unique Filename Automatically; Chapter 9: Finding Files with find; 9.1 How to Use find; 9.2 Delving Through a Deep Directory Tree; 9.3 Don't Forget -print; 9.4 Looking for Files with Particular Names; 9.5 Searching for Old Files; 9.6 Be an Expert on find Search Operators; 9.7 The Times That find Finds; 9.8 Exact File-Time Comparisons; 9.9 Running Commands on What You Find; 9.10 Using -exec to Create Custom Tests; 9.11 Custom -exec Tests Applied; 9.12 Finding Many Things with One Command; 9.13 Searching for Files by Type; 9.14 Searching for Files by Size; 9.15 Searching for Files by Permission; 9.16 Searching by Owner and Group; 9.17 Duplicating a Directory Tree; 9.18 Using "Fast find" Databases; 9.19 Wildcards with "Fast find" Database; 9.20 Finding Files (Much) Faster with a find Database; 9.21 grepping a Directory Tree; 9.22 lookfor: Which File Has That Word?; 9.23 Using Shell Arrays to Browse Directories; 9.24 Finding the (Hard) Links to a File; 9.25 Finding Files with -prune; 9.26 Quick finds in the Current Directory; 9.27 Skipping Parts of a Tree in find; 9.28 Keeping find from Searching Networked Filesystem; Chapter 10: Linking, Renaming, and Copying Files; 10.1 What's So Complicated About Copying Files; 10.2 What's Really in a Directory?; 10.3 Files with Two or More Names; 10.4 More About Links; 10.5 Creating and Removing Links; 10.6 Stale Symbolic Links; 10.7 Linking Directories; 10.8 Showing the Actual Filenames for Symbolic Links; 10.9 Renaming, Copying, or Comparing a Set of Files; 10.10 Renaming a List of Files Interactively; 10.11 One More Way to Do It; 10.12 Copying Directory Trees with cp -r; 10.13 Copying Directory Trees with tar and Pipes; Chapter 11: Comparing Files; 11.1 Checking Differences with diff; 11.2 Comparing Three Different Versions with diff3; 11.3 Context diffs; 11.4 Side-by-Side diffs: sdiff; 11.5 Choosing Sides with sdiff; 11.6 Problems with diff and Tabstops; 11.7 cmp and diff; 11.8 Comparing Two Files with comm; 11.9 More Friendly comm Output; 11.10 make Isn't Just for Programmers!; 11.11 Even More Uses for make; Chapter 12: Showing What's in a File; 12.1 Cracking the Nut; 12.2 What Good Is a cat?; 12.3 "less" is More; 12.4 Show Nonprinting Characters with cat -v or od -c; 12.5 What's in That Whitespace?; 12.6 Finding File Types; 12.7 Squash Extra Blank Lines; 12.8 How to Look at the End of a File: tail; 12.9 Finer Control on tail; 12.10 How to Look at Files as They Grow; 12.11 GNU tail File Following; 12.12 Printing the Top of a File; 12.13 Numbering Lines; Chapter 13: Searching Through Files; 13.1 Different Versions of grep; 13.2 Searching for Text with grep; 13.3 Finding Text That Doesn't Match; 13.4 Extended Searching for Text with egrep; 13.5 grepping for a List of Patterns; 13.6 Approximate grep: agrep; 13.7 Search RCS Files with rcsgrep; 13.8 GNU Context greps; 13.9 A Multiline Context grep Using sed; 13.10 Compound Searches; 13.11 Narrowing a Search Quickly; 13.12 Faking Case-Insensitive Searches; 13.13 Finding a Character in a Column; 13.14 Fast Searches and Spelling Checks with "look"; 13.15 Finding Words Inside Binary Files; 13.16 A Highlighting grep; Chapter 14: Removing Files; 14.1 The Cycle of Creation and Destruction; 14.2 How Unix Keeps Track of Files: Inodes; 14.3 rm and Its Dangers; 14.4 Tricks for Making rm Safer; 14.5 Answer "Yes" or "No" Forever with yes; 14.6 Remove Some, Leave Some; 14.7 A Faster Way to Remove Files Interactively; 14.8 Safer File Deletion in Some Directories; 14.9 Safe Delete: Pros and Cons; 14.10 Deletion with Prejudice: rm -f; 14.11 Deleting Files with Odd Names; 14.12 Using Wildcards to Delete Files with Strange Names; 14.13 Handling a Filename Starting with a Dash (-); 14.14 Using unlink to Remove a File with a Strange Name; 14.15 Removing a Strange File by its i-number; 14.16 Problems Deleting Directories; 14.17 Deleting Stale Files; 14.18 Removing Every File but One; 14.19 Using find to Clear Out Unneeded Files; Chapter 15: Optimizing Disk Space; 15.1 Disk Space Is Cheap; 15.2 Instead of Removing a File, Empty It; 15.3 Save Space with "Bit Bucket" Log Files and Mailboxes; 15.4 Save Space with a Link; 15.5 Limiting File Sizes; 15.6 Compressing Files to Save Space; 15.7 Save Space: tar and compress a Directory Tree; 15.8 How Much Disk Space?; 15.9 Compressing a Directory Tree: Fine-Tuning; 15.10 Save Space in Executable Files with strip; 15.11 Disk Quotas; Part IV: Basic Editing; Chapter 16: Spell Checking, Word Counting, and Textual Analysis; 16.1 The Unix spell Command; 16.2 Check Spelling Interactively with ispell; 16.3 How Do I Spell That Word?; 16.4 Inside spell; 16.5 Adding Words to ispell's Dictionary; 16.6 Counting Lines, Words, and Characters: wc; 16.7 Find a a Doubled Word; 16.8 Looking for Closure; 16.9 Just the Words, Please; Chapter 17: vi Tips and Tricks; 17.1 The vi Editor: Why So Much Material?; 17.2 What We Cover; 17.3 Editing Multiple Files with vi; 17.4 Edits Between Files; 17.5 Local Settings for vi; 17.6 Using Buffers to Move or Copy Text; 17.7 Get Back What You Deleted with Numbered Buffers; 17.8 Using Search Patterns and Global Commands; 17.9 Confirming Substitutions in vi; 17.10 Keep Your Original File, Write to a New File; 17.11 Saving Part of a File; 17.12 Appending to an Existing File; 17.13 Moving Blocks of Text by Patterns; 17.14 Useful Global Commands (with Pattern Matches); 17.15 Counting Occurrences; Stopping Search Wraps; 17.16 Capitalizing Every Word on a Line; 17.17 Per-File Setups in Separate Files; 17.18 Filtering Text Through a Unix Command; 17.19 vi File Recovery Versus Networked Filesystems; 17.20 Be Careful with vi -r Recovered Buffers; 17.21 Shell Escapes: Running One UnixCommand While Using Another; 17.22 vi Compound Searches; 17.23 vi Word Abbreviation; 17.24 Using vi Abbreviations as Commands (Cut and Paste Between vi's); 17.25 Fixing Typos with vi Abbreviations; 17.26 vi Line Commands Versus Character Commands; 17.27 Out of Temporary Space? Use Another Directory; 17.28 Neatening Lines; 17.29 Finding Your Place with Undo; 17.30 Setting Up vi with the .exrc File; Chapter 18: Creating Custom Commands in vi; 18.1 Why Type More Than You Have To?; 18.2 Save Time and Typing with the vi map Commands; 18.3 What You Lose When You Use map!; 18.4 vi @-Functions; 18.5 Keymaps for Pasting into a Window Running vi; 18.6 Protecting Keys from Interpretation by ex; 18.7 Maps for Repeated Edits; 18.8 More Examples of Mapping Keys in vi; 18.9 Repeating a vi Keymap; 18.10 Typing in Uppercase Without CAPS LOCK; 18.11 Text-Input Mode Cursor Motion with No Arrow Keys; 18.12 Don't Lose Important Functions with vi Maps: Use noremap; 18.13 vi Macro for Splitting Long Lines; 18.14 File-Backup Macros; Chapter 19: GNU Emacs; 19.1 Emacs: The Other Editor; 19.2 Emacs Features: A Laundry List; 19.3 Customizations and How to Avoid Them; 19.4 Backup and Auto-Save Files; 19.5 Putting Emacs in Overwrite Mode; 19.6 Command Completion; 19.7 Mike's Favorite Timesavers; 19.8 Rational Searches; 19.9 Unset PWD Before Using Emacs; 19.10 Inserting Binary Characters into Files; 19.11 Using Word-Abbreviation Mode; 19.12 Directories for Emacs Hacks; 19.13 An Absurd Amusement; Chapter 20: Batch Editing; 20.1 Why Line Editors Aren't Dinosaurs; 20.2 Writing Editing Scripts; 20.3 Line Addressing; 20.4 Useful ex Commands; 20.5 Running Editing Scripts Within vi; 20.6 Change Many Files by Editing Just One; 20.7 ed/ex Batch Edits: A Typical Example; 20.8 Batch Editing Gotcha: Editors Fail on Big Files; 20.9 patch: Generalized Updating of Files That Differ; 20.10 Quick Reference: awk; 20.11 Versions of awk; Chapter 21: You Can't Quite Call This Editing; 21.1 And Why Not?; 21.2 Neatening Text with fmt; 21.3 Alternatives to fmt; 21.4 Clean Up Program Comment Blocks; 21.5 Remove Mail/News Headers with behead; 21.6 Low-Level File Butchery with dd; 21.7 offset: Indent Text; 21.8 Centering Lines in a File; 21.9 Splitting Files at Fixed Points: split; 21.10 Splitting Files by Context: csplit; 21.11 Hacking on Characters with tr; 21.12 Encoding "Binary" Files into ASCII; 21.13 Text Conversion with dd; 21.14 Cutting Columns or Fields; 21.15 Making Text in Columns with pr; 21.16 Make Columns Automatically with column; 21.17 Straightening Jagged Columns; 21.18 Pasting Things in Columns; 21.19 Joining Lines with join; 21.20 What Is (or Isn't) Unique?; 21.21 Rotating Text; Chapter 22: Sorting; 22.1 Putting Things in Order; 22.2 Sort Fields: How sort Sorts; 22.3 Changing the sort Field Delimiter; 22.4 Confusion with Whitespace Field Delimiters; 22.5 Alphabetic and Numeric Sorting; 22.6 Miscellaneous sort Hints; 22.7 lensort: Sort Lines by Length; 22.8 Sorting a List of People by Last Name; Part V: Processes and the Kernel; Chapter 23: Job Control; 23.1 Job Control in a Nutshell; 23.2 Job Control Basics; 23.3 Using jobs Effectively; 23.4 Some Gotchas with Job Control; 23.5 The "Current Job" Isn't Always What You Expect; 23.6 Job Control and autowrite: Real Timesavers!; 23.7 System Overloaded? Try Stopping Some Jobs; 23.8 Notification When Jobs Change State; 23.9 Stop Background Output with stty tostop; 23.10 nohup; 23.11 Disowning Processes; 23.12 Linux Virtual Consoles; 23.13 Stopping Remote Login Sessions; Chapter 24: Starting, Stopping, and Killing Processes; 24.1 What's in This Chapter; 24.2 fork and exec; 24.3 Managing Processes: Overall Concepts; 24.4 Subshells; 24.5 The ps Command; 24.6 The Controlling Terminal; 24.7 Tracking Down Processes; 24.8 Why ps Prints Some Commands in Parentheses; 24.9 The /proc Filesystem; 24.10 What Are Signals?; 24.11 Killing Foreground Jobs; 24.12 Destroying Processes with kill; 24.13 Printer Queue Watcher: A Restartable Daemon Shell Script; 24.14 Killing All Your Processes; 24.15 Killing Processes by Name?; 24.16 Kill Processes Interactively; 24.17 Processes Out of Control? Just STOP Them; 24.18 Cleaning Up an Unkillable Process; 24.19 Why You Can't Kill a Zombie; 24.20 The Process Chain to Your Window; 24.21 Terminal Windows Without Shells; 24.22 Close a Window by Killing Its Process(es); Chapter 25: Delayed Execution; 25.1 Building Software Robots the Easy Way; 25.2 Periodic Program Execution: The cron Facility; 25.3 Adding crontab Entries; 25.4 Including Standard Input Within a cron Entry; 25.5 The at Command; 25.6 Making Your...

Le informazioni nella sezione "Su questo libro" possono far riferimento a edizioni diverse di questo titolo.

I migliori risultati di ricerca su AbeBooks

1.

Shelley Powers; Jerry Peek; Tim O'Reilly; Mike Loukides
Editore: O'Reilly Media (2002)
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 1
Da
Media Neat
(Niles, IL, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O'Reilly Media, 2002. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Brand New, Gift conditionWe Ship Every Day! Free Tracking Number Included! International Buyers Are Welcome! Satisfaction Guaranteed!. Codice libro della libreria 33074202t

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 33,51
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,69
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

2.

Shelley Powers; Jerry Peek; Tim O'Reilly; Mike Loukides
Editore: O'Reilly Media (2002)
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 2
Da
Media Neat
(Niles, IL, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O'Reilly Media, 2002. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Brand New, Gift conditionWe Ship Every Day! Free Tracking Number Included! International Buyers Are Welcome! Satisfaction Guaranteed!. Codice libro della libreria 343085134t

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 33,51
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,69
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

3.

Shelley Powers; Jerry Peek; Tim O'Reilly; Mike Loukides
Editore: O'Reilly Media (2002)
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 1
Da
Media Neat
(Niles, IL, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O'Reilly Media, 2002. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Brand New, Gift conditionWe Ship Every Day! Free Tracking Number Included! International Buyers Are Welcome! Satisfaction Guaranteed!. Codice libro della libreria 343086461t

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 33,51
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,69
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

4.

Shelley Powers; Jerry Peek; Tim O'Reilly; Mike Loukides
Editore: O'Reilly Media (2002)
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 2
Da
Media Neat
(Niles, IL, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O'Reilly Media, 2002. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Brand New, Gift conditionWe Ship Every Day! Free Tracking Number Included! International Buyers Are Welcome! Satisfaction Guaranteed!. Codice libro della libreria 343086780t

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 33,51
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,69
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

5.

Shelley Powers; Jerry Peek; Tim O'Reilly; Mike Loukides
Editore: O'Reilly Media (2002)
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 1
Da
Media Neat
(Niles, IL, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O'Reilly Media, 2002. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Brand New, Gift conditionWe Ship Every Day! Free Tracking Number Included! International Buyers Are Welcome! Satisfaction Guaranteed!. Codice libro della libreria 343087442t

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 33,51
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,69
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

6.

Powers, Shelley; Peek, Jerry; O'Reilly, Tim; Loukides, Mike
Editore: O'Reilly Media
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi PAPERBACK Quantità: 1
Da
Cloud 9 Books
(West Palm Beach, FL, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O'Reilly Media. PAPERBACK. Condizione libro: New. 0596003307 New Condition. Codice libro della libreria NEW6.0310541

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 38,12
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 4,62
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

7.

Powers, Shelley; Peek, Jerry; O'Reilly, Tim; Loukides, Mike
Editore: O'Reilly Media
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi PAPERBACK Quantità: > 20
Da
Mediaoutlet12345
(Springfield, VA, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O'Reilly Media. PAPERBACK. Condizione libro: New. 0596003307 *BRAND NEW* Ships Same Day or Next!. Codice libro della libreria SWATI2122351596

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 40,03
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,69
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

8.

Jerry Peek, Tim O Reilly, Mike Loukides
Editore: O Reilly Media, Inc, USA, United States (2002)
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 10
Da
The Book Depository US
(London, Regno Unito)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O Reilly Media, Inc, USA, United States, 2002. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. 3rd Revised edition. 234 x 178 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. With the growing popularity of Linux and the advent of Darwin, Unix has metamorphosed into something new and exciting. No longer perceived as a difficult operating system, more and more users are discovering the advantages of Unix for the first time. But whether you are a newcomer or a Unix power user, you ll find yourself thumbing through the goldmine of information in the new edition of Unix Power Tools to add to your store of knowledge. Want to try something new? Check this book first, and you re sure to find a tip or trick that will prevent you from learning things the hard way. The latest edition of this best-selling favorite is loaded with advice about almost every aspect of Unix, covering all the new technologies that users need to know. In addition to vital information on Linux, Darwin, and BSD, Unix Power Tools 3rd Edition now offers more coverage of bash, zsh, and other new shells, along with discussions about modern utilities and applications. Several sections focus on security and Internet access. And there is a new chapter on access to Unix from Windows, addressing the heterogeneous nature of systems today. You ll also find expanded coverage of software installation and packaging, as well as basic information on Perl and Python. Unix Power Tools 3rd Edition is a browser s book.like a magazine that you don t read from start to finish, but leaf through repeatedly until you realize that you ve read it all. Bursting with cross-references, interesting sidebars explore syntax or point out other directions for exploration, including relevant technical details that might not be immediately apparent. The book includes articles abstracted from other O Reilly books, new information that highlights program tricks and gotchas, tips posted to the Net over the years, and other accumulated wisdom. Affectionately referred to by readers as the Unix book, UNIX Power Tools provides access to information every Unix user is going to need to know. It will help you think creatively about UNIX, and will help you get to the point where you can analyze your own problems. Your own solutions won t be far behind. Codice libro della libreria AAH9780596003302

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 52,11
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: GRATIS
Da: Regno Unito a: U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

9.

Jerry Peek; Mike Loukides; Shelley Powers; Tim O'Reilly
Editore: O'Reilly Media (2002)
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 1
Da
Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O'Reilly Media, 2002. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. book. Codice libro della libreria 0596003307

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 54,11
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: GRATIS
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

10.

Powers, Shelley; Peek, Jerry; O'Reilly, Tim; Loukides, Mike
Editore: O'Reilly Media
ISBN 10: 0596003307 ISBN 13: 9780596003302
Nuovi PAPERBACK Quantità: 2
Da
Movie Mars
(Indian Trail, NC, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro O'Reilly Media. PAPERBACK. Condizione libro: New. 0596003307 Brand New Book. Ships from the United States. 30 Day Satisfaction Guarantee!. Codice libro della libreria 4312089

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 50,57
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,69
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi

Vedi altre copie di questo libro

Vedi tutti i risultati per questo libro