Collaborative Endeavors in the Chemical Analysis of Art and Cultural Heritage Materials

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9780841227309: Collaborative Endeavors in the Chemical Analysis of Art and Cultural Heritage Materials

The chemical analysis of art and cultural heritage materials began two centuries ago. In 1815 renowned British chemist Sir Humphry Davy described the analysis of pigments on objects excavated from the ruins of Pompeii in a paper that he read to the Royal Society (1). He wrote: "When the preservation of a work of art was concerned, I made my researches upon mere atoms of the colour, taken from a place where the loss was imperceptible: and without having injured any of the precious remains of antiquity, I flatter myself I shall be able to give some information, not without interest to scientific men, as well as to artists, and not wholly devoid of practical applications." Sir Davy hoped to not only become acquainted with the nature and chemical composition of the pigments, but to discover some idea of the manners and styles of the artists (2). The scientists authoring the chapters in Collaborative Endeavors in the Chemical Analysis of Art and Cultural Heritage Materials have taken the same footpath as Sir Davy in regard to the practicality of their research, but they have outpaced Davy in its appeal to a broader audience. The reader will find interesting chapters describing: the process of uncovering forgeries and counterfeits (Chapters 1, 11, 12, 16); the pedagogy of teaching the chemical analysis of art to undergraduates and the history of that <"movement>" (Chapters 13, 14, 15); the results of scientific investigations on art and cultural objects that have been performed primarily by students and their faculty mentor (Chapters 10, 11, 16, 17); the use of the latest technology in identifying pigments on prehistoric rock paintings, the dating of ancient objects, or the characterization of dyes or biomarkers on archeological samples (Chapters 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). The reader will also enjoy reading the viewpoint of museum conservators who have played a major role in writing and contributing to the science reported in some of the chapters (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 12 and 16). Perhaps most thought-provoking, is a chapter in Collaborative Endeavors that asks the question, <"What can science alone tell us?>" (See Chapter 9.)

But the book is not just a collection of several case studies of describing the chemical composition of objects of cultural or artistic interest; the book aims to illustrate how the chemical and physical analysis of art and cultural heritage materials is a perfect model of collaboration with museum curators, with historians, with students, with religious scholars, anthropologists, and/or with other specialists who partner to answer interesting and important questions about an archeological work or piece of art worthy of study: What are the materials? How was it made? Who influenced the work? How has it changed or deteriorated? Why was it made? Since no one scholar or scientist can answer all these questions, experts from many areas using many different kinds of analytical techniques are drawn together in Colloborative Endeavors to share their knowledge and experience. As a result, an understanding of how the molecular and atomic world plays a role with physical products of human expression is presented from many different perspectives.

Le informazioni nella sezione "Riassunto" possono far riferimento a edizioni diverse di questo titolo.

L'autore:

Patricia L. Lang is affiliated with Ball State University.

Contenuti:

  • Preface
  • 1. What’s Wrong with this Picture? The Technical Analysis of a Known Forgery
  • Gregory D. Smith, James F. Hamm, Dan A. Kushel, and Corina E. Rogge
  • 2. Scientific Examination and Treatment of a Painting by Gijsbert Gillisz d’Hondecoeter in the Mauritshuis
  • Lauren Paul Bradley, Sabrina Meloni, Erich Stuart Uffelman, and Jennifer L. Mass
  • 3. Handheld XRF Analyses of Two Veronese Paintings
  • Erich Stuart Uffelman, Elizabeth Court, John Marciari, Alexis Miller, and Lauren Cox
  • 4. Characterization of the Binders and Pigments in the Rock Paintings of Cueva la Conga, Nicaragua
  • R. Li, S. Baker, C. Selvius DeRoo, and R. A. Armitage
  • 5. Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Lower Pecos Rock Paints and Possible Pigment Sources
  • Jon Russ, Kaixuan Bu, Jeff Hamrick, and James V. Cizdziel
  • 6. Identification of Organic Dyes by Direct Analysis in Real Time-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry
  • Jordyn Geiger, Ruth Ann Armitage, and Cathy Selvius DeRoo
  • 7. Characterizing Organic Residues on Ceramics by Direct Analysis in Real Time Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry
  • John Hopkins and Ruth Ann Armitage
  • 8. New Developments in the <"Nondestructive>" Dating of Perishable Artifacts Using Plasma-Chemical Oxidation
  • Ruth Ann Armitage, Mary Ellen Ellis, and Carolynne Merrell
  • 9. The Roles of Chemistry and Culture in the Origins and Legacy of Crucible Damascus Steel Blades
  • Ann Feuerbach
  • 10. Elemental Composition of a Series of Medieval Korean Coinage via Energy-Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry
  • Danielle M. Garshott, Elizabeth MacDonald, Stephanie Spohn, Hana Attar, Jennifer Shango, Irice Ellis, Meghann N. Murray, and Mark A. Benvenuto
  • 11. Chemical Composition of a Series of Siamese Bullet Coins: A Search for Contemporary Counterfeits
  • Danielle M. Garshott, Elizabeth MacDonald, Meghann N. Murray, and Mark A. Benvenuto
  • 12. Analysis of the <"Archaic Mark>" Codex
  • Joseph G. Barabe, Abigail B. Quandt, and Margaret M. Mitchell
  • 13. Developing a Community of Science and Art Scholars
  • Patricia Hill and Deberah Simon
  • 14. The Chemistry of Artists’ Pigments: An Immersive Learning Course
  • Patricia L. Lang
  • 15. Bridging the Gap of Art and Chemistry at the Introductory Level
  • Anne Gaquere-Parker and Cass D. Parker
  • 16. Technical Examination of Cultural Heritage Objects Associated with George Washington
  • Erich Stuart Uffelman, Ronald W. Fuchs II, Patricia A. Hobbs, Lauren F. Sturdy, Danielle S. Bowman, and Derek A. G. Barisas
  • 17. The Spectroscopic Analysis of Paints Removed from a Polychrome Wood Sculpture of Male Saint
  • Patricia L. Lang, Shawn P. Leary, Rebecca F. Carey, Melissa N. Coffer, Rick E. Hamilton, Amber L. Klein, Randall T. Short, and Philip A. Kovac
  • Editors’ Biographies
  • Indexes
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index

Le informazioni nella sezione "Su questo libro" possono far riferimento a edizioni diverse di questo titolo.

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Editore: American Chemical Society (2013)
ISBN 10: 0841227306 ISBN 13: 9780841227309
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Descrizione libro American Chemical Society, 2013. Hardcover. Condizione libro: New. book. Codice libro della libreria 0841227306

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Descrizione libro Oxford University Press Inc, United States, 2013. Hardback. Condizione libro: New. 229 x 155 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. The chemical analysis of art and cultural heritage materials began two centuries ago. In 1815 renowned British chemist Sir Humphry Davy described the analysis of pigments on objects excavated from the ruins of Pompeii in a paper that he read to the Royal Society (1). He wrote: When the preservation of a work of art was concerned, I made my researches upon mere atoms of the colour, taken from a place where the loss was imperceptible: and without having injured any of the precious remains of antiquity, I flatter myself I shall be able to give some information, not without interest to scientific men, as well as to artists, and not wholly devoid of practical applications. Sir Davy hoped to not only become acquainted with the nature and chemical composition of the pigments, but to discover some idea of the manners and styles of the artists (2). The scientists authoring the chapters in Collaborative Endeavors in the Chemical Analysis of Art and Cultural Heritage Materials have taken the same footpath as Sir Davy in regard to the practicality of their research, but they have outpaced Davy in its appeal to a broader audience. The reader will find interesting chapters describing: the process of uncovering forgeries and counterfeits (Chapters 1, 11, 12, 16); the pedagogy of teaching the chemical analysis of art to undergraduates and the history of that movement (Chapters 13, 14, 15); the results of scientific investigations on art and cultural objects that have been performed primarily by students and their faculty mentor (Chapters 10, 11, 16, 17); the use of the latest technology in identifying pigments on prehistoric rock paintings, the dating of ancient objects, or the characterization of dyes or biomarkers on archeological samples (Chapters 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). The reader will also enjoy reading the viewpoint of museum conservators who have played a major role in writing and contributing to the science reported in some of the chapters (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 12 and 16). Perhaps most thought-provoking, is a chapter in Collaborative Endeavors that asks the question, What can science alone tell us? (See Chapter 9.) But the book is not just a collection of several case studies of describing the chemical composition of objects of cultural or artistic interest; the book aims to illustrate how the chemical and physical analysis of art and cultural heritage materials is a perfect model of collaboration with museum curators, with historians, with students, with religious scholars, anthropologists, and/or with other specialists who partner to answer interesting and important questions about an archeological work or piece of art worthy of study: What are the materials? How was it made? Who influenced the work? How has it changed or deteriorated? Why was it made? Since no one scholar or scientist can answer all these questions, experts from many areas using many different kinds of analytical techniques are drawn together in Colloborative Endeavors to share their knowledge and experience. As a result, an understanding of how the molecular and atomic world plays a role with physical products of human expression is presented from many different perspectives. Codice libro della libreria AAS9780841227309

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Editore: Oxford University Press Inc, United States (2013)
ISBN 10: 0841227306 ISBN 13: 9780841227309
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Descrizione libro Oxford University Press Inc, United States, 2013. Hardback. Condizione libro: New. 229 x 155 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. The chemical analysis of art and cultural heritage materials began two centuries ago. In 1815 renowned British chemist Sir Humphry Davy described the analysis of pigments on objects excavated from the ruins of Pompeii in a paper that he read to the Royal Society (1). He wrote: When the preservation of a work of art was concerned, I made my researches upon mere atoms of the colour, taken from a place where the loss was imperceptible: and without having injured any of the precious remains of antiquity, I flatter myself I shall be able to give some information, not without interest to scientific men, as well as to artists, and not wholly devoid of practical applications. Sir Davy hoped to not only become acquainted with the nature and chemical composition of the pigments, but to discover some idea of the manners and styles of the artists (2). The scientists authoring the chapters in Collaborative Endeavors in the Chemical Analysis of Art and Cultural Heritage Materials have taken the same footpath as Sir Davy in regard to the practicality of their research, but they have outpaced Davy in its appeal to a broader audience. The reader will find interesting chapters describing: the process of uncovering forgeries and counterfeits (Chapters 1, 11, 12, 16); the pedagogy of teaching the chemical analysis of art to undergraduates and the history of that movement (Chapters 13, 14, 15); the results of scientific investigations on art and cultural objects that have been performed primarily by students and their faculty mentor (Chapters 10, 11, 16, 17); the use of the latest technology in identifying pigments on prehistoric rock paintings, the dating of ancient objects, or the characterization of dyes or biomarkers on archeological samples (Chapters 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). The reader will also enjoy reading the viewpoint of museum conservators who have played a major role in writing and contributing to the science reported in some of the chapters (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 12 and 16). Perhaps most thought-provoking, is a chapter in Collaborative Endeavors that asks the question, What can science alone tell us? (See Chapter 9.) But the book is not just a collection of several case studies of describing the chemical composition of objects of cultural or artistic interest; the book aims to illustrate how the chemical and physical analysis of art and cultural heritage materials is a perfect model of collaboration with museum curators, with historians, with students, with religious scholars, anthropologists, and/or with other specialists who partner to answer interesting and important questions about an archeological work or piece of art worthy of study: What are the materials? How was it made? Who influenced the work? How has it changed or deteriorated? Why was it made? Since no one scholar or scientist can answer all these questions, experts from many areas using many different kinds of analytical techniques are drawn together in Colloborative Endeavors to share their knowledge and experience. As a result, an understanding of how the molecular and atomic world plays a role with physical products of human expression is presented from many different perspectives. Codice libro della libreria AAS9780841227309

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Patricia L. Lang, Ruth Ann Armitage
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Descrizione libro Oxford University Press Inc. Hardback. Condizione libro: new. BRAND NEW, Collaborative Endeavors in the Chemical Analysis of Art and Cultural Heritage Materials, Patricia L. Lang, Ruth Ann Armitage, The chemical analysis of art and cultural heritage materials began two centuries ago. In 1815 renowned British chemist Sir Humphry Davy described the analysis of pigments on objects excavated from the ruins of Pompeii in a paper that he read to the Royal Society (1). He wrote: "When the preservation of a work of art was concerned, I made my researches upon mere atoms of the colour, taken from a place where the loss was imperceptible: and without having injured any of the precious remains of antiquity, I flatter myself I shall be able to give some information, not without interest to scientific men, as well as to artists, and not wholly devoid of practical applications." Sir Davy hoped to not only become acquainted with the nature and chemical composition of the pigments, but to discover some idea of the manners and styles of the artists (2). The scientists authoring the chapters in Collaborative Endeavors in the Chemical Analysis of Art and Cultural Heritage Materials have taken the same footpath as Sir Davy in regard to the practicality of their research, but they have outpaced Davy in its appeal to a broader audience. The reader will find interesting chapters describing: the process of uncovering forgeries and counterfeits (Chapters 1, 11, 12, 16); the pedagogy of teaching the chemical analysis of art to undergraduates and the history of that " (Chapters 13, 14, 15); the results of scientific investigations on art and cultural objects that have been performed primarily by students and their faculty mentor (Chapters 10, 11, 16, 17); the use of the latest technology in identifying pigments on prehistoric rock paintings, the dating of ancient objects, or the characterization of dyes or biomarkers on archeological samples (Chapters 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). The reader will also enjoy reading the viewpoint of museum conservators who have played a major role in writing and contributing to the science reported in some of the chapters (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 12 and 16). Perhaps most thought-provoking, is a chapter in Collaborative Endeavors that asks the question, " (See Chapter 9.) But the book is not just a collection of several case studies of describing the chemical composition of objects of cultural or artistic interest; the book aims to illustrate how the chemical and physical analysis of art and cultural heritage materials is a perfect model of collaboration with museum curators, with historians, with students, with religious scholars, anthropologists, and/or with other specialists who partner to answer interesting and important questions about an archeological work or piece of art worthy of study: What are the materials? How was it made? Who influenced the work? How has it changed or deteriorated? Why was it made? Since no one scholar or scientist can answer all these questions, experts from many areas using many different kinds of analytical techniques are drawn together in Colloborative Endeavors to share their knowledge and experience. As a result, an understanding of how the molecular and atomic world plays a role with physical products of human expression is presented from many different perspectives. Codice libro della libreria B9780841227309

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Descrizione libro Amer Chemical Society, 2013. Hardcover. Condizione libro: Brand New. 1st edition. 328 pages. 6.10x9.10x0.90 inches. In Stock. Codice libro della libreria z-0841227306

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Descrizione libro 2013. Hardcover. Condizione libro: New. 159mm x 216mm x 25mm. Hardcover. The chemical analysis of art and cultural heritage materials began two centuries ago. In 1815 renowned British chemist Sir Humphry Davy described the analysis of pigments on o.Shipping may be from our Sydney, NSW warehouse or from our UK or US warehouse, depending on stock availability. 328 pages. 0.594. Codice libro della libreria 9780841227309

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Descrizione libro Oxford Univ Pr on Demand, 2013. Hardcover. Condizione libro: New. 15.88 x 23.5 cm. Our orders are sent from our warehouse locally or directly from our international distributors to allow us to offer you the best possible price and delivery time. Book. Codice libro della libreria MM-21166451

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