Armenia and Karabakh: The Stone Garden Travel Guide

Valutazione media 4,44
( su 25 valutazioni fornite da Goodreads )
 
9780967212074: Armenia and Karabakh: The Stone Garden Travel Guide

Armenia has a rich culture and a history that transcends its current borders and dates back 3,000 years. The essence and spirit of this ancient nation is magnificently captured in words and photos in "Armenia and Karabakh: The Stone Garden Travel Guide."

"Armenia and Karabakh" is unique as the largest and most colorful guidebook available for these countries. This is also the ONLY travel guide that specializes ONLY in Armenia and Karabakh. Its 320 pages are filled with more than 140 vibrant color images, and 27 detailed color maps. The text -- which is written in a conversational tone that's easy to read-- is comprehensive and filled with the wisdom of authors who are as comfortable in Armenia as they are when they are traveling back home in the US.

This is the only travel book on Armenia that is truly an "insider's guide." This is because its author Matthew Karanian, and its photographer Robert Kurkjian, have each lived, worked, and traveled throughout the region for nearly two decades. They spent year after year researching and updating this edition. As a result of their time spent, all of the travel research in this book is original, and when the book recommends a site, or suggests a travel route, it's because the authors have actually been there and know what's worth seeing and what's worth avoiding.

Visitors will find that this book is essential gear when traveling throughout Armenia and Karabakh, in the villages, as well as in the cities. This guide is indispensable in helping travelers make the best choices when deciding where to go, what to see, and where to eat and sleep.

Short term visitors who don't speak Armenian will be able to communicate with the assistance of the glossary of phrases. Travelers who have never been to Armenia, and also those who have made a dozen trips, will find the information about the country's historic sites to be equally fascinating and readable. Nature and conservation are also featured prominently. "Armenia and Karabakh" is still the only guide to the region that emphasizes environmental awareness and conservation as a primary focus for visitors.

The book's beautiful photography and intriguing background information makes this a book for armchair travelers, too. The photographs were all created during the research for the book, and they will help the traveler determine where to visit. In addition to being a valuable field guide for seasoned travelers this book is also an ideal introduction to the region with lots of intriguing facts and interesting anecdotes about the land and people.

This quality paperback has a durable binding and is a standard 5.375 x 8.375 inches to easily fit into your backpack while you are traveling. Detailed and full color maps, prepared by the American University of Armenia, cover every region of Armenia. Accurate street maps are included for every major city and town. Color tabs make it easy to locate information in any of the book's nine chapters.

Le informazioni nella sezione "Riassunto" possono far riferimento a edizioni diverse di questo titolo.

About the Author:

AUTHOR MATTHEW KARANIAN is a lawyer, writer, and photographer. He first traveled to Armenia in 1995, and he has worked there as Associate Dean of the law program at the American University of Armenia in Yerevan, and as Director of the university's Legal Research Center.

He and his students founded Armenia's first English-language law journal, the Armenian Law Review. He has also served on the editorial board of the Armenian International Magazine.

As a legal scholar, Karanian served as a Caucasus Specialist in the Republic of Georgia with the Institute for the Study of International Migration, a Georgetown University research center. He holds law degrees from Georgetown University Law Center, and from McGeorge School of Law, and he practices law in Los Angeles.

PHOTOGRAPHER ROBERT KURKJIAN, Ph D, is an environmental scientist, consultant, and photographer. He first traveled to Armenia in 1995, and he has served as Director of the Environmental Conservation and Research Center at the American University of Armenia in Yerevan.

He is the founder of Environmental Strategies International, a non-profit organization that works to protect human health and the environment.

Review:

A fresh view on ancient Armenia --Los Angeles Times, Travel Section
An excellent guide to a fascinating region, written with real passion for the subject. --CNN Traveller Magazine
A top guidebook. --The Washington Times

With thorough writing and illuminating photography, Karanian and Kurkjian cover Armenia and Karabakh the only way they could-- magnificently! --Yerevan Magazine
HE GOT ARMENIA UNDER THE SKIN, AND WE GET A GUIDEBOOK
By Christopher Reynolds
April 17, 2013, Los Angeles Times
By some measures, Matthew Karanian was a Connecticut Yankee: a 34-year-old litigator in Hartford, American-born and bred. But he had a wild idea. So he took a summer off, headed for the rustic land of his ancestors, and soon found that Armenia was rearranging his life.
Now, 18 years after that first visit, Karanian is an expert on the place. His self-published guidebook, Armenia and Karabakh (320 pages, $24.95), has just gone into a third edition. It s based on more than a dozen visits to the country, including a residency from 2002 to 2006. The photographs are by Karanian and Robert Kurkjian.
If you live near the California Armenian enclaves of Glendale or Fresno -- or it you ve met Karanian -- you may already know that Armenia is a landlocked, mountainous country almost the size of Maryland; that it lies south of Georgia, east of Turkey and west of Iran; and that it broke free from the Soviet Union in 1991. But Armenia is still terra incognita to many Americans.
And as Karanian acknowledges, the country faces plenty of challenges. The population, just under 3 million, is decreasing, partly because jobs are scarce. The country's border with Turkey is closed amid tensions that date to the Armenian genocide that began in 1915 under the Ottoman empire.
Armenians and others commemorate the genocide yearly with a worldwide day of remembrance on April 24. The Turkish government maintains that those 1.5 million deaths were part of the chaos of World War I, not a genocide.
Meanwhile, a border now separates Armenia from the Armenian culture's most revered geographic feature, Mt. Ararat. The mountain stands in Turkish territory but is visible from much of Armenia.
On his first visit to Armenia, Karanian recalls, the capital, Yerevan, was without electricity for most of every day. But the rugged beauty and depth of culture, he said, just turned my life upside down, yielding a stronger sense of ethnic identity and uncovering lost family history.
Karanian knew his grandparents immigrated to the U.S. about 100 years ago. But it wasn t until his book research began that he learned his great uncle, Mardiros Kheranyan, was a much-admired cartographer who charted the towns of historic Armenia in painstaking detail.
Now Karanian lives and practices law in Pasadena but makes yearly visits to the old country. Every year, he says, he sees better roads, more motorists willing to stop for pedestrians and more global brands, though no McDonald's yet.
In a two-part interview in early April (first in person and then online), Karanian took on 10 questions.
How many Americans visited Armenia last year?
Not enough. That s why I published the book. There were about 850,000 tourist visas issued for Armenia in 2012. More than half, maybe up to 70%, were issued to Diasporan Armenians.
What will I find on the sidewalks in the center of Yerevan?
There are so many sidewalk cafes in central Yerevan, sometimes it seems you can t go for a walk without falling into one. --Los Angeles Times

HE GOT ARMENIA UNDER THE SKIN, AND WE GET A GUIDEBOOK
By Christopher Reynolds
April 17, 2013, 8:30 a.m.
By some measures, Matthew Karanian was a Connecticut Yankee: a 34-year-old litigator in Hartford, American-born and bred. But he had a wild idea. So he took a summer off, headed for the rustic land of his ancestors, and soon found that Armenia was rearranging his life.
Now, 18 years after that first visit, Karanian is an expert on the place. His self-published guidebook, Armenia and Karabakh (320 pages, $24.95), has just gone into a third edition. It s based on more than a dozen visits to the country, including a residency from 2002 to 2006. The photographs are by Karanian and Robert Kurkjian.
If you live near the California Armenian enclaves of Glendale or Fresno -- or it you ve met Karanian -- you may already know that Armenia is a landlocked, mountainous country almost the size of Maryland; that it lies south of Georgia, east of Turkey and west of Iran; and that it broke free from the Soviet Union in 1991. But Armenia is still terra incognita to many Americans.
And as Karanian acknowledges, the country faces plenty of challenges. The population, just under 3 million, is decreasing, partly because jobs are scarce. The country's border with Turkey is closed amid tensions that date to the Armenian genocide that began in 1915 under the Ottoman empire.
Armenians and others commemorate the genocide yearly with a worldwide day of remembrance on April 24. The Turkish government maintains that those 1.5 million deaths were part of the chaos of World War I, not a genocide.
Meanwhile, a border now separates Armenia from the Armenian culture's most revered geographic feature, Mt. Ararat. The mountain stands in Turkish territory but is visible from much of Armenia.
On his first visit to Armenia, Karanian recalls, the capital, Yerevan, was without electricity for most of every day. But the rugged beauty and depth of culture, he said, just turned my life upside down, yielding a stronger sense of ethnic identity and uncovering lost family history.
Karanian knew his grandparents immigrated to the U.S. about 100 years ago. But it wasn t until his book research began that he learned his great uncle, Mardiros Kheranyan, was a much-admired cartographer who charted the towns of historic Armenia in painstaking detail.
Now Karanian lives and practices law in Pasadena but makes yearly visits to the old country. Every year, he says, he sees better roads, more motorists willing to stop for pedestrians and more global brands, though no McDonald's yet.
In a two-part interview in early April (first in person and then online), Karanian took on 10 questions.
How many Americans visited Armenia last year?
Not enough. That s why I published the book. There were about 850,000 tourist visas issued for Armenia in 2012. More than half, maybe up to 70%, were issued to Diasporan Armenians. And for the past several years, roughly 15% of all tourist visas were issued to Americans.
What will I find on the sidewalks in the center of Yerevan?
There are so many sidewalk cafes in central Yerevan, sometimes it seems you can t go for a walk without falling into one. But it s a seasonal thing. In the winter the only thing on the sidewalk is snow.
Read the rest of the interview at the website of the Los Angeles Times. ----Los Angeles Times, Travel Section

A top guidebook. --The Washington Times

With thorough writing and illuminating photography, Karanian and Kurkjian cover Armenia and Karabakh the only way they could-- magnificently! --Yerevan Magazine --Yerevan Magazine

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