Jabari Authentic Jamaican Dictionary of the Jamic Language: Featuring, Jamaican Patwa And Rasta Iyaric, Pronunciations And Definitions

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9780975534250: Jabari Authentic Jamaican Dictionary of the Jamic Language: Featuring, Jamaican Patwa And Rasta Iyaric, Pronunciations And Definitions

This user friendly dictionary includes over 3,000 clear concise definitions including: Jamaican Patwa, Rasta Iyaric, Slang terms, and National heroes. Also included: Pronunciation Guide, Variants, Usage Notes, Parts of Speech, Cross References, Idioms, and a special section about Jamaica. This is the first ever Jamic Language Dictionary. Specifically designed for Jamaicans and those who want to learn the language.

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From the Publisher:

Who seh wi chat patwa (patois)? It is said that Jamaicans, Trinidadians, Guyanese, St. Vincentians, Antiguans, all speak patois, which is the dialectal offspring of the language of the colonial powers of these islands. What do we really speak, and does our language have a distinct name? Let us first find out what is patois. It is an illiterate or provincial form of speech; broken English; jargon. Jargon is confused speech, gibberish, or technical phraseology.

SCHOLARS OF LINGUISTIC GEOGRAPHY

Ever since the late 17th century, English scholars of linguistic geography have been fascinated by the "broken English" spoken by Jamaicans. Broken English? What about the West African languages, namely Akan, Igbo, Wolof, Twi and others that are rooted in the linguistic protest of enslaved Africans in Jamaica: These so-called slaves, forbidden to speak in their native tongues, eventually developed an alternative to the King’s English by incorporating words from their various West African languages. Those words influenced today’s Jamaican words, such as dugu-dugu, quashie, buju, and countless others. Yes, a lot of the words we use are African, but very few people know about this. Why? The word patois does not take these things into consideration, and it undermines our unique and creative spirit as a people. The name of our language must reflect that out of many, we have one language. Thus the ideal name is Jamic. Jamic must be given credency because it represents the legacy of the Africans who formed the mode of communication, this vernacular. In this vein, Jamic is not just our spoken and written language, it is our language as a nation and people. Jam is short for Jamaica, and the suffix –ic, means of or relating to; therefore, Jamic simply means of or relating to Jamaica. In this case, it refers to the language. It must be noted, also, that the Rastas during the 1950s to 1980s took the language and formed their own argot: Iyaric. The lingo was developed in the spirit of self-determination, and the goal was to harness the power of word and its sound.

SPEECH PATTERN

This speech pattern is the "Principle of Word + Sound = Power" (W+S=P), a phonetic system that inflects specific words, depending on their sounds, to make them more appropriate in the context that they’re used, for instance, the word ‘downpressor’. Professor Hubert Devonish and others of the linguistics department at the University of the West Indies have advocated for the recognition of our language. But is it our language that they are promoting, or is it ‘broken English’ (as in Creole or patois?) Remember, if it is not Jamic, it is not ours. Interestingly, courses are being taught of "our" language in Britain’s Birmingham City College. Our national pride and self-determination make us, Jamaicans, the forerunners of change from oppression; therefore, we mush redefine ourselves. As a beginning, we must redefine the name of our language. Bob Marley said, "Emancipate yourself from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds." In celebrating our 43rd Independence, it should be made clear that we have a language of the people, for the people. We do not speak broken English, or patois, we speak Jamic. And we do so with pride.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

For a dictionary to be of any worth it must be simple and functional; it must provide concise, accurate definitions that will enable the user to apply a word or phrase in speech as well as in writing.

Since the late 17th Century, English scholars of linguistic geography have been fascinated by the "broken English" that developed in Jamaica, because it represented a marked deviation from the standards of formal English - i.e. pronunciations, definitions, and so on.

The legacy of this colloquial expression is rooted in the protest of enslaved Africans in Jamaica against British domination and indoctrination. These so-called slaves, forbidden to speak in their native tongues, eventually developed an alternative to the King's English, incorporating words from their various West African languages, namely Akan, Igbo, Wolof, and Twi, as well as several others; thus giving birth to the Jamaican vernacular, popularly known today as Jamaican Creole or Patios (Patwa).

It must be noted, as well, that the Rastafari Movement, through the 1950s to the 1990s, is responsible for broadening the understanding and application of the Patwa dialect. Rastas formed their own argot: Iyaric. This lingo was developed in the spirit of self-determination and with the goal of harnessing the power of a word and its sound.

The "I" or "i" is the most significant letter of the Iyaric alphabet, and is often placed before or used to replace a base word, as in the cases of Ithiopia, instead of Ethiopia, or I-an-I, instead of you and I, among others. This speech pattern is called the "Principle of Word + Sound = Power" (W+S=P), a phonetic system that inflects specific words, depending on their sounds, to make them appropriate in the context that they are used. For example:

WORD SOUND POWER/MEANING

appreciate (appre-shi-hate) appreshilove

oppressor (up-pressor) downpressor

understand (under-stand) overstand

The Jamaican culture is diverse, as anyone familiar with it can attest, and words differ slightly from parish to parish. At times the contrast between urban and rural, city and country, is so marked that words take on completely different sounds or meanings. The Jabari Authentic Jamaican Dictionary of the Jamic Language is a landmark achievement in the effort of Jamaicans to preserve and enhance their hard-earned linguistic legacy. This is indeed true, considering that the words presented in this compilation are standard - meaning, they are commonly understood throughout the island.

Although the vast majority of the words and phrases in the Jabari Authentic Jamaican Dictionary are Patwa, many are adaptations of the African American vernacular that were acculturated by Jamaican immigrant workers during the 19th and 20th Centuries. They are nonetheless rich in meaning and sound utterance.

There is no inflected word application in Jamaican Patwa, wherein a word is changed to indicate features such as person (gender), tense (present, past, future), or number (singular, plural). The user will even find English-spelled words taking on brand new meanings. In addition, many of the entries are regarded as "bad words" - meaning, they are obscene, vulgar or offensive. In these cases, user discretion is advised.

Admittedly, there is a great demand on the user to make a smooth transition into the linguistic patterns of Jamaican Patwa, because of the challenge to pronounce new sounds - be they nasal, guttural or lingual. The Jabari Authentic Jamaican Dictionary ensures the success of this challenge. In fact, it is useable throughout the entire English-speaking Caribbean, namely Antigua & Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Panama, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Trinidad & Tobago, as well as the Bahamas and Virgin Islands.

Importantly, this multi-dialect dictionary is user-friendly, and will appeal to laypeople as well as the literati. It will take the user to Jamaica and at the same time bring Jamaica to him or her; it will prove helpful in a practical way to those who desire to master Jamaican Patwa in a few weeks or in their lifetime; and it will be useful to anyone planning to visit the Edenic island and engaging in light conversation with Jamaicans.

We trust that this dictionary will be the ideal self-teaching tool for the home, school, office, social club, public library, and tourist resort.

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Ras Dennis Jabari Reynolds
Editore: Around the Way Books (2006)
ISBN 10: 0975534254 ISBN 13: 9780975534250
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 2
Da
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, U.S.A.)
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Descrizione libro Around the Way Books, 2006. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Codice libro della libreria P110975534254

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