ISBN 10: 1231045469 / ISBN 13: 9781231045466
Usato / Quantità: 0
Copie del libro da altre librerie
Mostra tutte le  copie di questo libro

Libro

Purtroppo questa copia non è più disponibile. Di seguito ti proponiamo una lista di copie simili.

Descrizione:

This Book is in Good Condition. Clean Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed. Codice inventario libreria

Su questo libro:

Book ratings provided by GoodReads):
0 valutazione media
(0 valutazioni)

Riassunto: This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 Excerpt: ...in spirituality, in moral qualities without which no permanent progress is possible, without which no nation can continue to exist. Among the things of the spirit are the arts, and of these it is music which more than any other expresses the inner worth and thought of man. Music is the last of all the arts, because it demands a greater human development than any other. Man needed the material things first. From the useful he progressed to a higher idea, the beautiful, and at last he finds the highest ideal of beauty within himself. The realization of this high ideal within himself will not only make a man more happy, but also more useful to himself and to others. He has gone through a "fire" and has become refined. From crude ore he has been changed to pure and rich metal. It took thousands of centuries to bring man kind thus far. Now anyone may advance in a few years beyond an entire era of former times and one man is worth more than were hundreds formerly. The past has shown us that man is, mentally at least, a rather lazy subject. If it were not so, humanity would have advanced much faster. Electricity and steam have existed from the creation of the world, but not until the American, Benjamin Franklin, harnessed electricity and the Scotchman, Stevenson, made use of steam power, were they of service to mankind. Up to the time of the German, Guttenberg, books used to be reproduced by the slow process of writing. Now a printing press can do in one hour what a thousand men could then do in a year. It required revolutions and warsjto awaken the slumbering intelligence of humanity. But as soon as a nation or a race made a step forward, reaction set in, striving to delay the march toward a higher ideal. The introduction of Christianity was the most im...

Le informazioni nella sezione "Su questo libro" possono far riferimento a edizioni diverse di questo titolo.

Dati bibliografici

Condizione libro: Used

I migliori risultati di ricerca su AbeBooks

1.

Eugene Feuchtinger
Editore: RareBooksClub
ISBN 10: 1231045469 ISBN 13: 9781231045466
Nuovi Paperback Quantità: 20
Print on Demand
Da
BuySomeBooks
(Las Vegas, NV, U.S.A.)
Valutazione libreria
[?]

Descrizione libro RareBooksClub. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 140 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.4in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 Excerpt: . . . in spirituality, in moral qualities without which no permanent progress is possible, without which no nation can continue to exist. Among the things of the spirit are the arts, and of these it is music which more than any other expresses the inner worth and thought of man. Music is the last of all the arts, because it demands a greater human development than any other. Man needed the material things first. From the useful he progressed to a higher idea, the beautiful, and at last he finds the highest ideal of beauty within himself. The realization of this high ideal within himself will not only make a man more happy, but also more useful to himself and to others. He has gone through a fire and has become refined. From crude ore he has been changed to pure and rich metal. It took thousands of centuries to bring man kind thus far. Now anyone may advance in a few years beyond an entire era of former times and one man is worth more than were hundreds formerly. The past has shown us that man is, mentally at least, a rather lazy subject. If it were not so, humanity would have advanced much faster. Electricity and steam have existed from the creation of the world, but not until the American, Benjamin Franklin, harnessed electricity and the Scotchman, Stevenson, made use of steam power, were they of service to mankind. Up to the time of the German, Guttenberg, books used to be reproduced by the slow process of writing. Now a printing press can do in one hour what a thousand men could then do in a year. It required revolutions and warsjto awaken the slumbering intelligence of humanity. But as soon as a nation or a race made a step forward, reaction set in, striving to delay the march toward a higher ideal. The introduction of Christianity was the most im. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Codice libro della libreria 9781231045466

Maggiori informazioni su questa libreria | Fare una domanda alla libreria

Compra nuovo
EUR 37,95
Convertire valuta

Aggiungere al carrello

Spese di spedizione: EUR 3,64
In U.S.A.
Destinazione, tempi e costi