The Fog: A Never Before Published Theory of the Bermuda Triangle Phenomenon

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9780738707570: The Fog: A Never Before Published Theory of the Bermuda Triangle Phenomenon

Whatever happened to Flight 19―five Navy bombers that vanished on a routine training mission―and the untold numbers of others who have disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle? What can we learn from intrepid adventurers like Christopher Columbus, Charles Lindbergh, and Bruce Gernon―the co-author of this book―who survived frightening encounters in the Triangle and lived to tell the tale?

The Fog presents pilot Bruce Gernon’s groundbreaking new theory of the Bermuda Triangle, based upon his own firsthand experiences, eyewitness reports from other close-call Triangle survivors, and leading scientific research. Gernon believes that a rare natural phenomenon may be behind many of the seemingly paranormal happenings in the Triangle, causing time distortions, pilot disorientation, and equipment malfunctions.

But the notorious Bermuda Triangle hasn’t given up all its secrets. The Fog also explores the Triangle’s connection to UFOs, a secret navy base, and a possible link to a vanished ancient civilization. 

 

 

 

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About the Author:

Bruce Gernon has made numerous appearances on documentaries featuring the Bermuda Triangle. He is an instrument-rated flight instructor and real estate broker, and has flown extensively in the Caribbean. Gernon has written about his experience for FATE magazine and will be featured on an NBC program on the Bermuda Triangle this fall. He receives frequent e-mail inquiries from all over the world regarding his experience with 'electronic fog' - a never-before-published, experience-based theory on the Bermuda Triangle mystery.

Robert MacGregor is a New York Times best-selling author of seventeen novels and seven published non-fiction books in the New Age field.  His novel, The Prophecy Rock won the Edgar Allan Poe Award for mystery writing. He has worked with George Lucas, Peter Benchley, and Billy Dee Williams, and has been the subject of many articles. MacGregor also has researched anomalous phenomena for many of his books, including seven Indiana Jones sagas and two remote viewing novels. He resides in sourthern Florida.

~

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

The Legacy and the Fog

The sailors, old and young, were gathered at the shell of the abandoned Naval Air Station in Fort Lauderdale. They'd arrived as they do every year, for a ceremony that has become a ritual, that will go on until all the old sailors who still remember have died. Then it might still go on. The ceremony isn't a commemoration of a battle or a victory, but of a loss, an unfortunate loss of five Navy Avenger TBM torpedo bombers that disappeared mysteriously into oblivion on December 5, 1945. The routine training flight turned into a tragedy and sparked a legend when the experienced pilots became disoriented over the Caribbean and never returned. Years later, Flight 19 would be known as the Lost Patrol-even though it wasn't a patrol-and it would mark the cornerstone of the Bermuda Triangle mystery.

A high-school band played a marching song, the Stars and Stripes fluttered in the breeze, and a general was about to address the gathering. At the edge of the crowd, Bruce Gernon, a civilian pilot, watched the proceedings with a special interest.

Gernon felt a strong connection with the pilots of Flight 19. Like them, he encountered mysterious, disorienting conditions over the Caribbean and barely escaped the clutches of a baffling force, an "electronic fog." He believes Flight 19 flew into the same conditions. Like the elusive Loch Ness monster, the force haunting the Bermuda Triangle apparently appears and disappears leaving no trace of its existence in its wake, other than the puzzle of lost vessels and crafts and the stories of those, like Gernon, who survived.

But if Gernon or anyone else in the crowd was hoping that Brigadier General Jerry McAbee would address the lingering question of what happened to the airmen and their planes, he would be disappointed. McAbee wasn't here to talk of the mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle, of strange clouds and odd banks of fog, hovering UFOs, time travel, or electromagnetic anomalies that send compasses into wild spins. Rather, he was here to honor the lost pilots, to carry on the tradition. Even so, there was something surreal about the marching band and the general honoring the flight that set off the Bermuda Triangle saga and the airmen who were last seen stepping from the gigantic spacecraft at the end of Stephen Spielberg's Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It almost seemed as if the ceremony were a scene from a movie in the making, and somewhere nearby a director, his storyboard in hand, would yell, "Cut!" And then they'd do it all over again.

When the ceremony was over, Gernon wandered out from the hangar and across the tarmac to the lone Avenger torpedo bomber that had flown in from Jacksonville for the ceremony. It was one of the few remaining in existence and soon attracted a crowd.

A few Navy veterans, who were here in 1945, stood by one wing discussing the disappearance of Flight 19. They seemed to possess an uncanny recollection of every detail, as if it occurred yesterday. Nearby, a crew from The Learning Channel, who had arrived from England to film the event as part of a documentary film on the Bermuda Triangle, turned their camera toward the bulky-looking craft. Gian Quasar, the creator of a lively Bermuda Triangle website, took a photo of Gernon by the plane and later added it to his site.

Most of the stories about the Bermuda Triangle are about the loss of lives, and aircraft that vanished without a trace. Gernon, though, is a human survivor of the Bermuda Triangle and has appeared in many of the documentaries about the mystery that have been produced in recent years. Where others have disappeared, Gernon returned with a story of a close encounter with mysterious forces.

At the time of this encounter, he'd never heard of the Bermuda Triangle, but he knew that something significant had happened to him. He thought about it every day and went over every detail. He wanted to make sure that he would remember it just as it happened. Then, more than a year later, he saw an interview on television with two men who were talking about strange events in the Caribbean. They used the term "Bermuda Triangle."

"Suddenly, I realized what happened to me wasn't an isolated event. It was part of something much bigger, and I'd survived it. I'd experienced the Bermuda Triangle first-hand."

A Strange Cloud
Hardly a day goes by when Bruce Gernon doesn't reflect in one way or another on what happened to him one afternoon on a flight more than thirty years ago. He might recall some aspect of the experience, or mention something about it to a friend or acquaintance. Or he might reflect on the entire scene, which long ago he vowed never to forget.

On the hour drive from the Flight 19 ceremony in Fort Lauderdale to his home in Wellington, Florida, in Palm Beach County, Gernon described his experience in detail. "My dad was a developer and I was a builder, and in 1970 we were searching the Bahamas for an island to build a resort," Ger-non began. "We decided on Andros Island, and had made a dozen flights, when on December 4 we encountered something we would never forget."

Gernon was piloting their new Bonanza A36, a stable and smooth-flying aircraft. Even today, more than three decades later, the Bonanza airframe remains relatively unchanged and is one of general aviation's finest performing airplanes. If he had been flying a slower and less stable aircraft that day, Gernon believes that he may not have survived the flight. Although he had planned to take off in the morning, ever the cautious pilot, Gernon delayed the flight until the weather improved. "We waited all morning while it rained and it was close to 3:00 PM when my dad and I, along with Chuck Layfayette, a business associate, took off from Andros Town Airport."

He remembered that the sky was overcast and a light mist was falling. "Weather information wasn't available, so I decided to get airborne, then call Miami Flight Service for atmospheric conditions." As they made a turn after departing the runway, Gernon looked over to the terminal where he saw his friend, John Woolbright, waving to him. Woolbright was a mathematician at the Atlantic Undersea Test Evaluation Cen(AUTEC), a navy facility based on the island, which, ironically, would play a role in the Bermuda Triangle mystery.

They climbed to 1,000 feet and assumed a heading of 315 degrees. They couldn't go any higher because of a cloud ceiling at 1,500 feet. "My father was also a pilot and an expert navigator, so we flew the plane together on a direct route to Bimini. We tuned into the Bimini radio beacon on our automatic direction finder, and also used a magnetic compass."

They were cruising at 180 miles an hour and had been flying for about ten minutes when the drizzle ended and the skies cleared. By then, they had reached the northwest end of Andros Island and were flying over the ocean shallows of the Great Bahama Bank. The visibility had improved from about three miles to ten miles and the weather ahead appeared non threatening.

As they started to gain altitude, Gernon noticed an almond-shaped lenticular cloud directly in front of them, about a mile away. While other clouds move across the sky with the air currents, lenticular clouds tend to remain stationary. The cloud appeared to be about a mile-and-a-half long and a thousand feet thick, with the top of it reaching an altitude of 1,500 feet. It was white, with smooth edges and appeared inoffensive. However, he found one thing odd about the cloud.

"I'd seen quite a few lenticular-shaped clouds, but never at such a low altitude. They are usually up at 20,000 feet."

But Gernon couldn't spend much time looking at the cloud because he was busy filing his flight plan with the Miami Flight Service. They would fly to Bimini, then directly to West Palm Beach. Miami Radio, the call sign for the flight service, offered a promising forecast. The weather would be clear between Andros and the Florida coast, with a few scattered, isolated thunderstorms of moderate intensity in South Florida. Winds were light and variable, and the temperature was 75 degrees.

By this time, at about ten miles offshore and climbing toward their intended altitude of 10,500 feet, Gernon noticed that the lenticular cloud had changed into a huge, billowy, white, cumulus-shaped cloud. "We were climbing at a thousand feet per minute, and the cloud seemed to be building up underneath us at the same rate that we were ascending."

It rose so quickly that it occurred to him that they were flying over a cumulonimbus cloud, one of the most dangerous to fly through, and that it was about to form a monstrous thunderhead.  "Chuck started to get nervous. He had never come this close to a cloud while flying in a small airplane. I assured him that we would break free of it at any moment, and leave it behind."

But after ascending for several minutes, they were nearly one mile high and the cloud was still ascending with them. Then, unexpectedly, the cloud caught up and engulfed the Bonanza. They felt a slight updraft, and visibility was reduced to less than a hundred feet. After about thirty seconds, they broke free of the clouds and continued their ascent.

"But the cloud was still right below us, rising at the same rate," Gernon recalled. "I couldn't even get ten yards above the cloud, and after another half-minute, it closed around us again."

Suddenly, another updraft provided an unexpected burst of acceleration, that pushed them up above the cloud. But then their vertical speed diminished and the cloud caught up to them again. The scenario was repeated at least five more times. "Dad and Chuck were getting worried," Gernon remembered. And Dad suggested we go back to Andros."

Making a 180-degree turn would be risky, but Gernon was considering it when suddenly the airplane broke free again at 11,500 feet and the sky was clear. He leveled the Bonanza and accelerated to a cruising speed of 195 miles per hour.

"What I didn't realize at the time was that the cloud must have been moving horizontally at least 105 miles an hour, our climbing speed, as well as vertically. But when it stopped its horizontal movement, we were finally free of it. When I looked back at the cloud, I was astonished at what I saw. The cloud was still rapidly building, and was enormous. That small lenticular cloud that we had initially flown over had taken on the shape of an immense squall."

But unlike most squalls, which form in a line, this cloud curved in a perfect semicircle and radiated out on either side of them. It appeared to extend out at least ten miles in either direction. After a few minutes, they left the cloud behind and continued on their path toward Bimini under clear skies. "Everything was back to normal, so I engaged the autopilot, sat back, and started to relax."

Trapped
But, after a few minutes, they noticed another squall forming in front of them. "As we approached the cloud, moving at about three miles a minute, an eerie sight began to unfold. To my consternation, the cloud looked very much like the one we'd left behind. It had a similar curving, semicircular shape, except now the arms extended in the opposite direction, directly toward us. The top of this enormous cloud reached at least 40,000 feet."

Then Gernon noticed something else that surprised him. Normal cumulus clouds have a base, or ceiling, one or two thousand feet above the surface. If the cloud is producing rain, the base is usually at about 1,000 feet and sometimes as low as four or five hundred feet. But, as they flew within a few miles of the cloud, he saw that this cloud appeared to emanate directly from the ocean.

"I realized that we couldn't go either under the cloud or above it, and attempting to circumvent it would take us considerably off our flight path. Besides, the arms of the cloud were already stretching out on either side of us, so we couldn't make an easy escape. However, the cloud didn't look too threatening, so after conferring with Dad, I decided to fly into it. I had flown under clouds in heavy rain and I'd penetrated them while flying with instrument-rated pilots, but pilots are supposed to steer clear of strong thunderstorms, and the 10,000-foot level was supposed to be the most dangerous altitude to fly through a storm. I'd been told that there could be updrafts and downdrafts in excess of 100 miles an hour in the heart of a thunderstorm cell."

They were about forty-five miles east of Bimini when they entered the misty edges of this enormous cloud formation. Once inside, Gernon realized he might've made a mistake. Although the cloud was white and fluffy on the outside, its interior was dark, as if night suddenly had fallen.

"But it didn't stay dark for long. Bright white flashes lit up the interior of the cloud. They seemed to go on and off in a neverending, random pattern, and the deeper we penetrated, the more intense the flashes became."

Although there were no bolts of lightning, Gernon had no doubt that they'd entered an electrical storm and were in danger. "When my father asked if I was going to continue on, I didn't have to think very long to answer. I shook my head, turned 135 degrees and assumed a due south heading."

All three men were wearing watches, and they noted that they were deviating from their course at 3:27 PM. An electric-powered clock on the panel, which included a timer that Gernon had engaged upon takeoff, indicated that they'd been airborne for twenty-seven minutes. His father started the timer on his watch when they changed their course, and using very-high frequency OmniRange navigation equipment (VOR), he calculated that they were forty miles southeast of Bimini. Meanwhile, Gernon contacted Miami Radio on the VHF and told them that they had altered their course to avoid a thunderstorm, and they were attempting to fly around it.

"We thought we might be able to avoid the semicircular-shaped cloud to the south, but after traveling six or seven miles, we could see that the cloud continued on our left toward the east. Then, a couple minutes later, we realized that the cloud that we encountered near Andros and the second cloud were now connected. As far as I could tell, the enormous cloud encircled us. I estimated that the diameter of the opening was about thirty miles. We were trapped inside a billowing prison with no way out. We couldn't go over or under it."

The Tunnel Vortex
Gernon's concern was increasing by the minute, but he knew he had to remain calm. He tried to understand how they'd gotten into this predicament. It seemed that the storm was created first in the form of a lenticular cloud just offshore of Andros Island, and then had rapidly spread outward, forming the shape of a donut. He remembered what it was like inside the thunderstorm, and the last thing he wanted to do was fly back into the powerful storm cell.

They'd flown about ten miles from the point where they'd turned south when he noticed a breach in the massive cloud on the west side. The U-shaped aperture, Gernon thought, was where the two arms of the expansive cloud had not yet met.

At the top, on either side, the cloud extended outward in the shape of an anvil. So it looked as if the cloud soon would form a bridge. The anvil shape is commonly ...

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Descrizione libro Llewellyn Publications,U.S., United States, 2005. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Language: English . Brand New Book. Whatever happened to Flight 19--five Navy bombers that vanished on a routine training mission--and the untold numbers of others who have disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle? What can we learn from intrepid adventurers like Christopher Columbus, Charles Lindbergh, and Bruce Gernon--the co-author of this book--who survived frightening encounters in the Triangle and lived to tell the tale? The Fog presents pilot Bruce Gernon s groundbreaking new theory of the Bermuda Triangle, based upon his own firsthand experiences, eyewitness reports from other close-call Triangle survivors, and leading scientific research. Gernon believes that a rare natural phenomenon may be behind many of the seemingly paranormal happenings in the Triangle, causing time distortions, pilot disorientation, and equipment malfunctions. But the notorious Bermuda Triangle hasn t given up all its secrets. The Fog also explores the Triangle s connection to UFOs, a secret navy base, and a possible link to a vanished ancient civilization. Codice libro della libreria FLT9780738707570

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Descrizione libro Llewellyn Publications,U.S., United States, 2005. Paperback. Condizione libro: New. Language: English . Brand New Book. Whatever happened to Flight 19--five Navy bombers that vanished on a routine training mission--and the untold numbers of others who have disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle? What can we learn from intrepid adventurers like Christopher Columbus, Charles Lindbergh, and Bruce Gernon--the co-author of this book--who survived frightening encounters in the Triangle and lived to tell the tale? The Fog presents pilot Bruce Gernon s groundbreaking new theory of the Bermuda Triangle, based upon his own firsthand experiences, eyewitness reports from other close-call Triangle survivors, and leading scientific research. Gernon believes that a rare natural phenomenon may be behind many of the seemingly paranormal happenings in the Triangle, causing time distortions, pilot disorientation, and equipment malfunctions. But the notorious Bermuda Triangle hasn t given up all its secrets. The Fog also explores the Triangle s connection to UFOs, a secret navy base, and a possible link to a vanished ancient civilization. Codice libro della libreria FLT9780738707570

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